Catching Up On Ideas For Better Innovation

Owing to a hectic week of travel, both personal and professional, I didn’t get to finish a post I’m working on, so I guess I’ll take my cues from the mass media. When it doubt, rehash old content. Well, maybe I can do slightly better than that thanks to a nice integration of some prior DBL content by Walt Crawford. In his role as leader of the fairly new PALINET Leadership Network, Crawford has arranged with various bloggers to mashup and re-post their content. One good example of that work recently appeared over at the Leadership Network.

In a piece titled Innovation and Control several different past DBL posts come together to provide a surprisingly coherent essay on creating opportunities for expanding or faciliting innovation and creativity in libraries. If you are fairly new to DBL and want to catch up on some of the past posts on innovation and creativity take a moment to give this a read.

Note – there is a possibility that you may need to register for the Leadership Network to get to this article though I don’t think it is necessary. Like many wiki communities registration may only be needed if you want to add your content. However, if you have any sort of interest in leadership and related issues, why not get registered for the PLN while you are there.

Author: StevenB

Steven J. Bell - StevenB is the Associate University Librarian for Research and Instructional Services at Temple University. In addition to contributing to ACRLog he maintains Kept-Up Academic Librarian and the Keeping Up Web Site. Steven is also the co-founder of the Blended Librarians Online Learning Community. He is an active member of ACRL's College Library Section. Additional information about Steven can be found on his personal web site.

1 thought on “Catching Up On Ideas For Better Innovation”

  1. Steven,

    Thanks for the note. I’d like to believe I’m getting really good at minimalist editing: I did almost nothing to the DBL pieces in order to combine them into a single essay.

    On one hand, no, people won’t need to register to read that article. Only protected articles require registration–as does any actual new content. Most new articles aren’t protected, as a matter of policy, unless protection is requested by the author or the content is licensed third-party content.

    On the other: I hope people take your advice and register–and come back and contribute!

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